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Posts Tagged ‘retaining gen y’

Challenges That Faculty Face with Today’s College Students

January 13th, 2013

Hi All!

I’ve been researching today’s College Students a lot recently due to a few key factors:

1. I know a lot of College Professors and Faculty from a wide variety of educational institutions who constantly complain about “how different” their students are these days versus previous generations. I even hear from younger professors, in their early-mid 30’s, who express this opinion, too, so it’s not JUST coming from Boomer and Veteran generation faculty who have been teaching for 25+ years!

2. I’m getting a lot of speaking invitations from educational institutions (i.e. colleges, universities, and vocational schools) to speak to their faculty about how to better communicate with, and educate, their students. I wouldn’t be getting these invitations if this issue wasn’t “real”.

And I can tell you that regardless of the “type” of school they are from, OR the types of subjects they are teaching, OR the student population they serve, the educators I talk to all share the same frustrations and challenges with the students they teach today.

Here are just a few examples of the common ones I hear (and what I focus on in my presentations to help the educators overcome): Students today are lazy; they need to be told “how” to learn; they show up late for class and want to leave early; they show disregard for homework deadlines and exam dates; their parents call on behalf of their adult child with questions or complaints; Etc…

It’s based on this growing “issue” regarding Millennial (aka: Gen Y) students that I decided to blog about this topic today. I don’t plan to provide answers to the challenges mentioned above in this post; I’m simply bringing this interesting issue to light because I typically write about Millennials from an “employee” angle versus a student angle.

To shed more light on this, I recommend that you read this book: “Generation on a Tightrope: A Portrait of Today’s College Student,” written by Dr. Arthur Levine with Diane R. Dean. It covers 2006 to 2011, and distills information from surveys and interviews with both undergraduates and student-affairs officials at 31 campuses nationwide. Dr. Levine is the president of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and former president of Teachers College at Columbia University.

Here’s a brief overview about the book and the information it provides:

An understanding of today’s undergraduate college students is vital to the effectiveness of our nation’s colleges and universities. As Generation on a Tightrope clearly reveals, today’s students need a very different education than the undergraduates who came before them: an education for the 21st Century, which colleges and universities are so far ill-equipped to offer and which will require major changes of them to provide. Examining college student expectations, aspirations, academics, attitudes, values, beliefs, social life, and politics, this book paints an accurate portrait of today’s students. Timely and comprehensive, this volume offers educators, researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and employers, guidance and a much-needed grasp of the forces shaping the experiences of current undergraduates. The book:

  • Is based on completely new research of 5,000 college students and student affairs practitioners from 270 diverse college campuses
  • Explores the similarities and differences between today’s generation of students and previous generations

So whether you’re an educator or an employer, books such as that could be one more tool to help you better understand this new generation you face. And for employers, this could also give you insights for better managing, recruiting and retaining this much-needed generation at work.

I can honestly say they truly are different from previous generations…I’ve been writing, consulting and speaking about Millennials for over 6 years as an expert, as well as conducting Leadership and Personal Branding workshops for Millennial employees and students, so I know them well.

Bye for now!

Lisa

 

 

40 Percent of the Fortune 500 Won’t Exist in 10 Years Due to Gen Y

January 13th, 2012

Hi All!

Okay…so for over 5 years companies have been hiring me to conduct presentations about how to manage, recruit and retain Millennials (aka: Generation Y). And, as an expert, they also hire me to conduct training workshops for Millennial employees that cover leadership, business etiquette, generations at work, communication and personal branding for career success. BUT, according to an article I came across yesterday, it looks like I might see an uptick of even more Fortune 500 companies contacting me.

Why? Well, according to the article entitled, “Gen Y Traits in the Workplace Unveiled” by Kristin Burnham, she shares:

Millennial Branding together with Identified.com, studied 4 million Gen Y Facebook profiles to obtain better insight into how members of this generation operate professionally-a topic of increasing importance as they are projected to make up 75 percent of the workforce by 2025.

According to the study, only 7 percent of Gen Y reports working for a Fortune 500 company-a statistic in line with another report that predicts that 40 percent of the Fortune 500 will no longer exist 10 years from now.

So, where are they going to work? The article states:

Instead, Gen Y workers are turning to startups in which the hiring process tends to be much quicker than that of the Fortune 500, and where Dan Schawbel says Gen Yers feel they can make more of an immediate impact.

While Gen Yers are turning more to startups for employment, they’re also branching out on their own in what Schawbel calls an “unprecedented entrepreneurial spirit.” “Owner” is the fifth most-popular job title, trumped by “server” (No. 1), “manager” (No. 2), “intern” (No. 3) and “sales associate (No. 4).

Retention is also a challenge with Gen Y because according to the report, they only average 2 years at their first job.

These are serious statistics and facts that large companies need to be aware of. If 75% of our workforce is going to made up of Millennials by 2025 (that’s only about 10 years away!!) companies need to start preparing NOW for a solid recruitment and retention plan of talent. I’ve been preaching this for a long time and the smart companies are already doing everything they can to retain their younger talent because they know their companies’ future well being NEEDS younger talent now, and they need to groom them for future leadership positions.

On average, 1 Boomer is retiring every 8 seconds, so companies are also scrambling to retain their employees who are 55+, too. NOT every Boomer was affected by the economic downturn so we have millions of them who CAN retire comfortably at 60-65 years old but companies need their expertise and knowledge to help the younger employees grow.

I’ve written TONS of articles, and have been interviewed by countless media, about these topics because it’s ALL true. But I also find many companies still have their head in the sand and suffer from denial. I have endless research material on the labor shortage the US is facing, and it’s based on the perfect storm of birth rates, Boomers retiring, etc. The numbers don’t lie, people!

Sure, because of the current economy it’s still an “employers” market…however I’ve been warning executives in my seminars that it will change soon, and the competition for talent is going to re-ignite and then it will turn into an “employee” market again and employers will be begging for top talent…and employees will be in control of the whole enchilada.

EMPLOYERS: Start planning NOW and get ahead of the curve…and if you’re a Fortune 500 company, as many of my clients are, YOU really need to take all of this seriously!

Bye for now,

Lisa

Half of Boomers at Risk of Not Enough Retirement Savings

March 01st, 2011

Hi All,

This is very disturbing and the statistics are startling! Here’s the general scoop:

According to The EBRI Retirement Readiness RatingTM in 2010: 47.2% of older Boomers (56-62) are at risk of outliving their retirement savings. And 43.7% of younger Boomers (46-55) are at risk of not having enough money for basic monthly expenses when they retire.

47.2%??? That’s almost half of Boomers 56 to 62! Those statistics are staggering. This means we have millions of people who cannot afford to stop working at 65 and are currently seeking ways to make more income now and on an on-going basis past 65. And the report also discusses the risk that Gen X and Millennials (aka Gen Y) also face, based on current economic conditions, for their retirement futures.

If you’re interested in receiving a free copy of the complete 2010 EBRI.org report, here’s the info: The EBRI Retirement Readiness Rating:TM Retirement Income Preparation and Future Prospects by Jack VanDerhei and Craig Copeland, Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI.org).

But wait! There’s more! Did you know that according to a special report entitled Next Generation Leaders: Competency Deficits and The Bridge to Success by Judy Chartrand, Ph.D. and Bonnie Hagemann, Baby Boomers are currently retiring at the rate of 1 every 8 seconds? And this massive retirement trend has just started!

Sure, the immediate thought is they’ll just stay in the workforce longer to generate income, but not all of them can, or will, so employers are scrambling to find head count. I’ve written about this before, and I speak about this a lot. It’s a big issue that is the hot topic of conversation at companies across the U.S., along with the importance of their attracting, recruiting and retaining Gen Y employees.

But what I found really scary were the statistics about not having enough money to retire. This will then cause a huge economic impact on our government aid programs and healthcare programs. 

Ouch! We’re talking MILLIONS of Boomers! I hope the top brass who run our eldercare programs are getting things in order…this is going to be a major issue for our country starting now and for the next 20 years.

Bye for now,

Lisa

21st Century Employee Theft: Using the Internet at Work. Is your company clear on its policies?

April 08th, 2008

Hello,

There is a new type of employee theft that is causing “lawsuits and losses” for employers: excessive use of the internet at work for things other than work. And, with more Millennials entering the workforce, employers believe that it will become an even bigger issue than it has been. Yes, Boomer and Gen Xers are using the internet at work for things other than “business”, but the issue will get bigger if companies don’t get strict about their internet use policies.

1. Have you outlined a policy for employee participation on blogs?

Guess what? This issue is so widespread there’s now a term for it! If you are fired because of a blog it’s called being “dooced”. Heather Armstrong founded Dooce.com, and lost her job a year after starting a blog for writing entries that involved colleagues. She now tells her site visitors: “Never write about work on the Internet unless your boss knows and sanctions the fact that you are writing about work on the Internet.”

Another person who lost his job due to blogging was as a producer at CNN’s “American Morning”. He was a blogger and he was fired when the company discovered his name attached to blog posts written without CNN’s approval. He never identified himself as a CNN employee on the blogs, but CNN company policy is that employees must first get permission to write for a non-CNN outlet.

Sound hardcore? Maybe, maybe not. But you need to determine how YOUR company feels about this and get policies in place. Did you know that a new blog is created every second? Millennials love blogging, as do other generations, but Millennials will more likely be participating in blogging on a regular basis (more that older generations) and your company policies must be UP-DATED to accomodate the changing times.

2. Outline a policy for viewing “those types” of pics AND playing online games.

Millions of people look at porn on their computers at work. I cannot even believe how dumb that it, but whatever. Nonetheless, it’s a HUGE problem. A recent study by the AMA showed that 1/3 of bosses have fired employees for viewing dirty pics/videos at work. That’s a HUGE number!

And make sure your workforce is clear about your policies on playing online games. Is it okay on their lunch break? Or NOT AT ALL at work? Online game play at work is rampant, so make sure you have your policies in order.

3. What about talking dirty?

A very large percentage of employees are talking dirty from their computers, pdas, cell phones and laptops at work. In the same AMA study I mentioned before, more than 25% of bosses have fired employees for sending offensive emails. And because many companies now store/archive employee email correspondence electronically, “talking dirty” can become a liability to employers. Again, get your policy in place because people are sending “sexy” emails and text messages using YOUR property, and/or on your time, and that’s a problem.

Times they are-a-changing! It’s time for your company to dust off its old employee policies and up-date them based on REAL 21st Century issues.

Okay…time to stop blogging and get back to work. Luckily no one can fire me!

Lisa

Survey Results About What Employers Look at Most from Recent College Grads

April 02nd, 2008

Hi there!

According to a recent survey conducted by CollegeGrad.com, a great website for entry level job seekers, here’s what employers are looking for in NEW college grads:

The results:

#1 – The student’s major (44%)
#2 – The student’s interviewing skills (18%)
#3 – The student’s internship/experience (17%)
#4 – The college the student graduated from (10%)
#5 – Other miscellaneous qualifications (5%)
#6 – The student’s GPA (4%)
#7 – The student’s personal appearance (1%)
#8 – The student’s computer skills (1%)

I came across this info on a great blog called: Jobacle

In another study (conducted by SHRM) that I discuss in my seminars and speaking appearances, they outlined what employers believe is important to have a “globally” competitive workforce. These were the top 3 answers:

- 63.3% of employers surveyed stated it is important for college grads to know a second language

- 77.8% stated having “critical thinking” ability is key

- 73.6% said hiring new college grads that were creative and innovative was key

Lots to consider nowadays when seeking your next generation of managers and leaders!

Bye for now,
Lisa

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