Blog

Posts Tagged ‘interviewing tips’

How to Create a Resume or CV that Gets You Interviews

June 16th, 2014

In the business I’m in, I review a lot of resumes and CVs and I know a great deal of Recruiters, HR Executives

Lisa Orrell, CPC: The Generations Relations & Leadership Expert

Lisa Orrell, CPC: The Generations Relations & Leadership Expert, and author of the NEW book,”Your Employee Brand is in Your Hands!”

and Hiring Managers who do as well. And we all agree on one thing: most resumes and CVs are bad. Really bad.

I’m not talking about grammar mistakes or ugly formatting, although there is plenty of that. I’m talking about descriptions that make no sense, whole lines and paragraphs that are so full of clichés and corporate-speak that they don’t actually communicate anything, and missing details that any potential employer would want to know. You’d be amazed how often I can read a whole job description and not know what the person actually did. Or if I do know what they did, I often have no idea if they did it well.

As a Professional Speaker and Trainer, I conduct many career-focused workshops for college students. And trust me when I say, their resumes aren’t great, but they aren’t that much worse than many seasoned professionals who should know better. The resume is the most important document any individual can create for finding a job. After all, the resume can be the difference between the job of your dreams and just something that pays the bills.

So how can they be so universally bad given the incentive that very smart and competent professionals have to do them well?

The reason is it’s very hard to self-evaluate your accomplishments and communicate them effectively. It’s hard to see yourself objectively, and if you are in a field that is at all technical, it can be incredibly difficult to communicate your work to people in HR and recruiting. It is very hard to separate yourself from your own experience, memories, and associations, and objectively and effectively communicate your experience and skills.

What can you do?

That’s why I recommend that job seekers consider hiring a resume writing service. The problem is that there are just so many bad ones out there. And paying somebody to review a document might seem like a waste of money since you can find a friend to read your resume and critique it.

Trust me, it’s worth it. Unless someone has seen a truly great resume they won’t know what’s wrong with yours. And unless they’ve made truly great resumes, in a variety of fields, they can’t tell you how to create one.

Therefore, I recommend looking into Resume to Interviews to create your resume, CV, and other career related documents (LinkedIn profile, cover letter, etc.). It doesn’t matter whether you are a college student, C-level executive, or someone in between. It’s an awesome, cost-effective, service and one of the few legitimate services that exist that provides real value. In fact, their blog provides some valuable how to write a resume guide for specific industries like nursing and IT.

Here’s an overview of how they describe their service and how it can benefit you:

Your resume reflects YOUR Personal Brand!

We’re a company that creates custom resumes, CV’s, cover letters and personal statements (aka: Personal Branding) that stand out and get noticed among the mountains of resumes and CV’s that employers and recruiters have to wade through on a daily basis. At Resume to Interviews, our goal isn’t to create a good looking resume, or one that looks like others you’ve seen in your field.

We create resumes that are better than what you’ve seen before, and better than most hiring managers have seen before as well. That’s why they pick up the phone so quickly to set up interviews with our clients.

Resumes to Interviews has created over 5,000 resumes and CV’s over the last seven years and they create close to 100 each month for clients from all over the world and in every conceivable industry. What really sets them apart is their process: they have you fill out an intake questionnaire (this takes work on your part) and use it to create a brand new document, which they then perfect during a back and forth editing process with you.

They don’t just proofread your document and change some language. They ask you hundreds of questions to develop your content and carefully target it towards job listings you provide. And the process isn’t over until you are 100% satisfied.

Plus, they offer LinkedIn Profile consultation and Professional Coaching services for interviewing tips, as well.

All of that said, here are two questions for you:

Why spend countless hours trying to draft your own resume or CV only to find out it’s one of the “bad ones” that gets immediately thrown in the trash? Why not consider a service like theirs to ensure your resume separates itself from the piles of mediocre resumes that get sent to employers every time a job opening in posted online?

I think you know the answer to those questions. So check out Resume to Interviews.

Wall Street Journal Says Panel Interviews Are Gaining Popularity

July 17th, 2008

Hi All,

This article is courtesy of Peggy McKee, a professional medical sales recruiter. It has some interesting insights for job candidates, recruiters and managers wanting to conduct panel interviews. What IS a “panel interview”? Keep reading!

And this new interviewing style is something Millennial/Gen Y needs to be aware of while looking for a job after college graduation.

Tips for a Successful Panel Interview by Peggy McKee

Panel interviews are gaining in popularity these days. Why? They save time, since the candidate interviews with everyone at once rather than go through a series of private interviews. They can be more reliable and job-related, since interviewers have each other to keep them accountable and to help them stay on track.

These interviews are very good for sales, sales management, and marketing for medical sales, pharmaceutical sales, laboratory sales, pathology sales, imaging sales, molecular products sales, cellular products sales, biotechnology sales, and medical device sales, but less helpful for technical, customer service, and field service positions in healthcare.

However, panel interviews can the most stressful for the candidate of all interview types since they seem impersonal and more judgmental.

Click here to read Peggy’s tips for conducting a successful panel interview, and to see her video with bonus tips!

And you can click here to see an article about “panel interviews” from the Wall Street Journal.

Bye for now!

Lisa

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.

 

Survey Results About What Employers Look at Most from Recent College Grads

April 02nd, 2008

Hi there!

According to a recent survey conducted by CollegeGrad.com, a great website for entry level job seekers, here’s what employers are looking for in NEW college grads:

The results:

#1 – The student’s major (44%)
#2 – The student’s interviewing skills (18%)
#3 – The student’s internship/experience (17%)
#4 – The college the student graduated from (10%)
#5 – Other miscellaneous qualifications (5%)
#6 – The student’s GPA (4%)
#7 – The student’s personal appearance (1%)
#8 – The student’s computer skills (1%)

I came across this info on a great blog called: Jobacle

In another study (conducted by SHRM) that I discuss in my seminars and speaking appearances, they outlined what employers believe is important to have a “globally” competitive workforce. These were the top 3 answers:

- 63.3% of employers surveyed stated it is important for college grads to know a second language

- 77.8% stated having “critical thinking” ability is key

- 73.6% said hiring new college grads that were creative and innovative was key

Lots to consider nowadays when seeking your next generation of managers and leaders!

Bye for now,
Lisa