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Posts Tagged ‘global workforce’

I Taught Personal Branding to Millennials in Brunei

December 07th, 2014

Hello!Brunei-Zaidah-Pic-1

I recently had an amazing experience: The Government of Brunei Darussalam hosted a Leadership Conference for Millennials (aka: Gen Y), attended by  employees from both private and public sector organizations. And they hired me to be a featured speaker at the event, so I flew to their capital, Bandar Seri Begawan, and it was awesome!

While there, I conducted my Personal Branding Workshop for them. But what was very interesting is that when I asked how many of them had ever heard the term Personal Branding, only 2-3 attendees out of 300+ raised their hand. However they rapidly embraced the concept, and took the training very seriously.

Brunei-Audience-picBrunei is a small country that shares a border with Indonesia. And, even with a population of only 440,000, organizations there are running into the same challenges we have here in the U.S.; they are having to move younger employees into leadership roles sooner and that is creating new challenges for the Millennials AND their employers.

Just like Millennials here, they need training on leadership and management. And employers are interested in knowing more about managing, recruiting and retaining Gen Y.

Yes, people, the “Millennial” phenomenon is a GLOBAL workforce issue. If it weren’t, I wouldn’t have been hired to fly across the globe. Right?

While there, I experienced a bit of celebrity, which was fun! They had ordered 300 copies of my third book, “Millennials into Leadership”, and most all of theBrunei-Newspaper attendees wanted me to sign their copies, plus they all wanted to take pics with me.

Then, the day after I spoke, I opened their main daily newspaper, and there I was featured in a big article. I’m moving there. LOL

I also spent some time sightseeing. One main highlight that day was the private boat tour I took. We went into the jungle where I saw crocodiles and monkeys!

Anyway, the whole things was a unique experience that I wanted to share. The people of Brunei were extremely gracious and hospitable. I’m hoping to work with them again in 2015!

Stress at Work is the New Health Epidemic Amongst Generations

December 11th, 2013

Hi All!

Dubbed the “health epidemic of the 21st century” by the World Health Organization, stress at work is increasingly being seen as a costly issue, thus stress management is becoming one of the most important challenges for employers across the globe. And employees, from all generations, are struggling due to stress. In the U.S. alone, 3 out of 4 workers describe their work as stressful!

A few of the key factors that cause stress for employees include: Firings, cost-cutting, business readjustments, working in an uncomfortable environment, unclear supervision, trouble with the boss, changes in financial status, altered responsibilities, variations in work hours, changed work conditions and office procedures, and transitioning to a different line of work.

However, work-family conflicts are increasingly common, especially with the growing issue of Baby Boomers being “caught in the middle” as The Sandwich Generation. They are now not only caring for their own Gen Y (aka: Millennial) children but also having to be caregivers for their elderly Veteran Generation parents…all while having to maintain a full-time job in the workforce!

The financial, emotional, and physical stress of this dilemma on the Boomers is staggering, and it’s going to continue to grow in severity. So employers are going to have to manage and support it…quickly.

Smart companies are addressing stress in the workplace because it makes good business sense; employee stress-related issues are costing employers around the globe a fortune. Here’s just a few fast facts (out of many on this topic) to illustrate this:

  1. According to a study in the UK, 20% of employees experience work-related distress on an average day, which amounts to 40% of sick days.
  2. On average, American businesses suffer annual losses worth $300 billion, with each employee contributing $2,000 to the losses, in lower productivity, absenteeism, staff turnover, medical insurance, workers compensation, among other stress-related expenses.
  3. 60% of lost workdays each year are attributed to stress.
  4. Only 29% of employees are able to operate at peak productivity levels due to stress.

Based on those stats, it is crucial for employers to take earnest steps to deal with the problem and help employees cope with occupational stress.

Organizations looking to compete in a volatile marketplace are proactively making efforts to address the issue seriously. Examples include:

  • Analyzing the situation to find the root cause of the workforce stress and developing solutions to reduce the issue, such as: educating employees on work life balance, offering telecommuting opportunities, and providing flexible work weeks.
  • Leveraging employee assistance programs, which may include individual counseling, interpersonal skill development, team building, and organizational consulting on change management.
  • Encouraging employees to take responsibility for their health and motivating and supporting them to do so.
  • Requiring staff to do self-assessments in order to find out how they are feeling and asking them to identify factors they think might be contributing to pressure or stress. By getting feedback from staff and responding with a customized plan for each person can be very effective.
  • Taking steps to improve the company’s marketing approach to raise managers’ awareness of the employee benefit programs, such as: online wellness workshops, employee assistance programs, online seminars on issues of workplace stress, and mindfulness training.
  • Communicating regularly with employees to reduce uncertainty in their minds about job security. An employer, and its Leadership and Management Team, should ensure that communication with employees is friendly, motivating, and supportive, giving an equal opportunity to the latter to make themselves heard. It is the employer’s responsibility to show employees that they are valued to the organization. Rewarding workers is a good way to recognize their performance and reinforces their sense of worth to the company.
  • Reducing environmental stress, such as uplifting the workplace by improving air flow, natural lighting, reducing noise pollution, and providing quiet rooms for rejuvenation, can also help improve employee focus and attention, thus reducing their occupational stress.

By focusing on individual stress management and organizational change, businesses can produce more productive, healthier, happier, and motivated employees. But employers have to make it a priority and foster a corporate culture that truly embraces health and wellness in their workplace…not just “say” they do!

Survey Results About What Employers Look at Most from Recent College Grads

April 02nd, 2008

Hi there!

According to a recent survey conducted by CollegeGrad.com, a great website for entry level job seekers, here’s what employers are looking for in NEW college grads:

The results:

#1 – The student’s major (44%)
#2 – The student’s interviewing skills (18%)
#3 – The student’s internship/experience (17%)
#4 – The college the student graduated from (10%)
#5 – Other miscellaneous qualifications (5%)
#6 – The student’s GPA (4%)
#7 – The student’s personal appearance (1%)
#8 – The student’s computer skills (1%)

I came across this info on a great blog called: Jobacle

In another study (conducted by SHRM) that I discuss in my seminars and speaking appearances, they outlined what employers believe is important to have a “globally” competitive workforce. These were the top 3 answers:

- 63.3% of employers surveyed stated it is important for college grads to know a second language

- 77.8% stated having “critical thinking” ability is key

- 73.6% said hiring new college grads that were creative and innovative was key

Lots to consider nowadays when seeking your next generation of managers and leaders!

Bye for now,
Lisa