Blog

Posts Tagged ‘economy’

What Gen Y Means to Occupy Movement and Presidential Election

February 05th, 2012

Hi All!

I recently came across a great blog post by Carol Phillips, a colleague of mine who is also a Millennial (aka: Gen Y) Expert, however she focuses on them as consumers, whereas I tend to focus on them more as employees. And Carol is also the President of BrandAmplitude, LLC and runs the Millennial Marketing blog.

The blog post she wrote, and that I’d like to share with you, is entitled: What the Occupy Movement Means to the Millennial Vote in 2012.

Here is an excerpt from Carol’s blog post:

In the recession-dominated four years since the last Presidential election, Gen Y has gone from being optimistic and ‘hopeful’ to discouraged and angry.  The shift seemed to have happened quite suddenly, triggered by the realization that trillions of stimulus dollars, gigantic industry takeovers and costly bank bailouts were insufficient to create jobs and give young adults a toehold in the economy.

Why ‘sudden’? Even as little as a year ago, I would never have predicted anything like the Occupy Wall Street movement. In fact, when Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert launched their “Rally to Restore Sanity/Fear” in Washington DC last October, I wondered whether it would resonate with a generation notable for its lack of protest and desire to work within the system to create change:

“… the truth is, this generation does care. They are caring by not participating, by disassociating. Stewart also understands this; he gets their approach. They are conservative liberals. They want to change the system without marching down Main Street. Without lowering themselves to the same tactics, name calling and bickering they detest. It’s hard to have a voice when you are disgusted by the tone of the conversation. So instead of joining, they are quiet rebels who challenge the status quo by the way they live, not how they protest. …. The “Rally to Restore Sanity” was a TV staged event they attended, not a grass roots rally they created. Just like Demand TV or ITunes, it was offered up and they clicked “attend.”

When you’re hurting, inequity is an easy concept to grasp — just ask any four year old.  In 2011, evidence of unfairness was easy to find.  The concept that lit the spark was growing lopsidedness in wealth distribution. The target of resentment was easy to find, as well – Wall Street. The way money is made by corporate fat cats and Wall Street bankers became the focus of Millennial discontent, not those who set the rules in Washington. This is good for Obama, and bad for Republicans who are more associated with the 1% than the 99%.

So, what does Carol think it will take to win the Millennial vote in 2012? Click here to read her entire blog post and see what she has to say!

Bye for now,

Lisa

Career Expert’s New Book Examines Today’s Internships in America

June 07th, 2011

New Book Explores the Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Internships in America Today!

Hi All!

I wanted to share this Press Release with you about a new book I highly recommend checking out, Lies, Damned Lies & Internships: The Truth About Getting from Classroom to Cubicle, by Heather R. Huhman.

PRESS RELEASE:

Today’s internships are creating and evolving the next generation of our workforce – and generating controversy, urban myths, and false prophets. In her newest book, Lies, Damned Lies & Internships: The Truth About Getting from Classroom to Cubicle (Happy About, 2011), career expert and experienced hiring manager Heather R. Huhman examines the condition of internships in today’s economy – and tackles the good, bad, and ugly.

Available on June 6, 2011, Lies, Damned Lies & Internships explores the current state of internships, buried in misconception, exploitation, and controversy, and gets down to what really matters: experience and education.

Huhman, who has been recognized by CNN/CareerBuilder for the past two years as a ‘top job tweeter you should be following’ and included in Monster.com’s ‘The Monster 11 for 2011: Career Experts Who Can Help Your Search,’ says, “As a five-time intern and proud intern-employer, I believe that an intern is hired to learn, not to go on coffee runs and make endless copies. In fact, internships aren’t meant to be ‘jobs’ at all. This book looks at both sides of the internship debate – and ignites a new discussion amongst legislators, employers, universities, parents, and, of course, interns.”

Lies, Damned Lies & Internships includes a forward by Mark Babbitt, CEO of YouTern. According to Babbitt, “It is time for all of us, across the board – corporate America, higher education and the intern candidates themselves – to focus on the importance of high-quality, mentor-based internships as a means to transition from academic pursuits to the real world.”

In Lies, Damned Lies & Internships, Huhman discusses:

  • Recent controversies surrounding internships
  • The importance of internships
  • Characteristics of a good internship program
  • How to create an internship program
  • Current problems and possible solutions
  • An analysis of “internships gone bad”
  • How to turn an internship into full-time employment
  • How to turn interns into full-time employees

Lies, Damned Lies & Internships is available for purchase and download at Happy About. Soon, the eBook also can be enjoyed on the Kobo, Kindle, iPhone/iPad, Nook, and Google Books.

ABOUT HEATHER R. HUHMAN:

Heather R. Huhman is the Founder & President of Come Recommended, and has nearly a decade of public relations and marketing experience, specializing in media relations, content marketing, and social media. She is also a well-recognized career expert, an experienced hiring manager, and someone who has been in nearly every employment-related situation imaginable.

Grab a copy of her book today! It’s interesting and definately worth reading!

Bye for now,

Lisa

Seven Tips for Gen Y Job Seekers in This Tough Economy

April 23rd, 2011

Hi All!

We all know the current job market is tough, regardless of what generation you’re from. But for many Millennials (aka: Gen Y), who are inexperienced when it comes to searching for a job, it can be an even tougher time. So this article provides all you newbie job seekers, and recent college grads, with (7) tips that will give you an edge over your job-seeker competition.

  1. Start a Blog: Not “just” a blog – a blog that covers the news and information about specific companies, or industries, where you’d like to work. You can then contact the company(s) and let them know you have a blog that is “about them and their industry”. This can attract their attention and give you an edge over just submitting a resume. Even micro-blogging on Twitter using this strategy is smart. It helps you promote your Personal Brand!
  2. Make Yourself Known: Many newbie job seekers send their resume and then do nothing. Making 1-2 follow-up calls is not enough. Until someone tells you “the position is filled”, keep calling, emailing, and inquiring. Sure, it may seem like you’re annoying, but you are making yourself memorable, and that’s key.
  3. Know Your Target: Make sure you include the terminology used within that industry, and/or by that company, when submitting your info to them. This can range from the job titles they use to the industry/company jargon they use. The point here is to make your resume and cover letter “customized” to them, not generic to ANY industry and/or company.
  4. Don’t Rely on Your Computer: Yes, the Internet is a powerful networking tool. And, of course, network on social networks like FaceBook, Twitter and LinkedIn. But face-to-face contact can be more powerful. Attend local professional networking events in industries you’re interested in. Interested in a Marketing career? Attend your local AMA chapter mixer. Each month, attend as many “live” networking events as possible. Not only will you make a lot of contacts but you’ll become better at “selling yourself” which can help when you interview.
  5. Make Business Cards: Don’t arrive to networking events or job interviews without business cards. You can even make your title “Job Seeker in Finance” (or whatever you’re looking for). And on the back print a few bullets about you: Education, Degree, strengths, etc. These can be like mini-resumes and they give you something interesting to hand to people (versus writing your contact info on a napkin at an event). Make your own cards and get them printed inexpensively through online services like LogoMaker.com.
  6. Thank You Cards: Whenever your return home from an interview or networking event, or even from a casual encounter with someone you met at a party where you discussed your employment, send a hand written thank you note to everyone you met. People tend to send thank yous via email, but a hand written note makes a big impression nowadays because very few people send them!
  7. Be “Employed” Through Volunteering: If you’re unemployed, use some of your free time to volunteer at a local non-profit. That reflects well on you when interviewing. You can say that you volunteer 15-20 hours per week for XYZ organization and your tasks include…employers want to know you’re “doing something” other than looking for a job full time. It also shows them you’re hard working and not just sitting around your home waiting for a job.

And, don’t be afraid to get creative! There was a great story last year about an unemployed father of 3 from the financial industry who wore a nice suit and a sandwich board on the streets of New York, advertising he was looking for a job. And you know what? Within a short time he landed a job with a top company in his industry! Why? Because people from that company saw him daily and started to talk to him…may sound a bit nuts, but this economy is a bit nuts, so think outside the box in your job seeking efforts!

Bye for now,

Lisa

Several Hot Companies Hiring Run By Generation X or Millennial CEO's

October 26th, 2009

Hey All!

The job market may be tough, but there are some hot companies that are hiring in this economy…and according to Fortune’s new 40 Under 40 list, these companies are owned or run by members of Generation X or Millennial (aka Generation Y) CEO’s…yes, people under 40.

And are they all tech startups funded with new VC money? Uh, no. Oh, and did I mention quite a few of the CEO’s only list a high school diploma as their highest education level completed…or a Bachelor’s degree?

CNNMoney.com published this article last week, so check it out. Quite a few of these businesses are currently hiring for 20 or more positions: sales, marketing, social media, project managers, product managers, engineers, human resources, accounting, and customer service.

The article also includes information from the CEO’s about what they’re looking for in job candidates, and what will turn them off to applicants.

So, if you’re seeking a job, and you’re a Millennial (Generation Y), Generation Jones, Gen X or Boomer, you need to check out this article. Companies ARE hiring; but they may not all be mainstream brands you’re aware of! However this list includes a few that are, such as Walmart.com and Facebook.

Here’s an excerpt from the article to give you a taste of what it includes:

These rising stars from Fortune’s 40 under 40 list have great jobs to fill. What are they looking for and how can you impress them?

Max Levchin, Slide Founder

40 under 40 rank: 25

What openings do you have at Slide now?
We are always short great product managers and designers. We are rarely limited by our demand, but rather by the available supply of awesome people in the job market.

What’s great about the jobs?
You get to work at the very forefront of innovation in social software, so you learn an enormous amount very quickly.

What are you looking for?

My favorite type of hire is the budding entrepreneur; someone who in a few years will want to start their own thing. They know that with every effort at Slide they are ultimately investing in themselves the most and so tend to be very productive.

Any secrets to impressing you?
Bring not just your skills, but also your thoughts (about the industry, Slide, etc.) to the interview. If you’re engaged and interested, it tends to stand out.
–Jessi Hempel

Click here to read the whole article!

Bye for now!

Lisa

P.S. Not following me on Twitter? Do! @GenerationsGuru

New Research Shows Gen X is More Likely to Quit a Job Than Gen Y

September 10th, 2009

Hi All!

Had  great day today! I conducted a mini-version of my “Get A Grip On Gen Y” seminar for the Women in Business chapter of the Santa Cruz Chamber of Commerce. There were over 100 attendees and the event was held at the newly renovated Dream Inn Hotel. The meeting space had sweeping views of the beach and was amazing! All you meeting planners need to check this place out for events!

Anyway, it was a great group and we all shared a lot of laughs. I love doing presentations with people and energy like that!

Here’s the deal with the topic I’m sharing on this post: Talent Management (talentmgt.com) published an article this month about how Gen X employees are more likely to quit their job, and are searching for new ones, more than Gen Y (aka Millennials). Millennials get a bad rap for being job hoppers, but it really may be that employers need to be focusing on the retention of their Gen X talent just as much, if not MORE, than their Millennials.

The article is entitled: Consider Cost-Effective Alternatives to Retain Gen X, written by Erin Green

Here’s a brief excerpt:

Though employers are increasingly concerned about talent retention post-recession, their focus is often on retaining millennials instead of a more immediate concern: Generation X employees may already have one foot out the door.

“More than 20 percent of Generation X employees have already been looking for new employment in the past 12 months, which is the highest [amount of active job seekers] for any generation,” said Robin Erickson, a manager in the human capital practice of Deloitte Consulting LLP.

Gen Xers’ strong desire to move up to managerial positions may be the main reason for the anticipated turnover.

“Forty percent of Generation X employees cited lack of career progress as the prime motivation to switch jobs today, which is considerably higher than their survey colleagues in Generation Y [at] 30 percent, baby boomers [at] 20 percent and veterans [at] 14 percent,” said Erickson.

Deloitte will publish a report later this month – a follow-up to the July report “Managing Talent in a Turbulent Economy” – that will reveal new survey data on employee perspectives by generation and region. The data comes from a global survey of employees, covering all regions – the Americas, Asia Pacific, and Europe, Middle East and Africa.

The article continues with more interesting info, so check it out!

Bye for now,

Lisa

« Older Entries